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Coronavirus and Being Prepared

ARE YOU PREPARED?
 
As reports of the Coronavirus continue to dominate the news and there have been some confirmed cases in the United States, people should be aware of the facts regarding the virus and how you can keep yourself, your family, and your workers safe.
 
We have included up-to-date-information from the MA Department of Public Health and tips about prevention and treatment of the virus with links to OSHA and the CDC guidelines and recommendations.
 

MA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
 
As of February 27, there has been one confirmed case of this novel coronavirus in Massachusetts.The risk to residents in Massachusetts remains low.
 
As of February 27, CDC is updating United States case counts based on repatriated individuals. For the latest on case counts, visit the CDC website.
 
SYMPTOMS OF THE INFECTION:

  • fever
  • cough and shortness of breath, and
  • in severe cases, pneumonia (fluid in the lungs).
 
The Massachusetts Department of Public Health is working closely with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to provide updated information on its website as it becomes available. Click here for more information.
 
According to the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Massachusetts is prepared for this potential outbreak. Massachusetts public health departments and our world-class health care providers are well-versed in emergency preparedness and our healthcare workers, institutions and public health partners across the Commonwealth are constantly training for the possible emergence of diseases.
 
 
HAZARD RECOGNITION -OSHA  
STANDARDS - OSHA
 
Understand how OSHA standards apply to protecting workers from COVID-19.
   
CONTROL AND PREVENTION - OSHA
 
Take steps to prevent worker exposure to COVID-19. OSHA provides general tips for all workers and employers, information for workers traveling to or from areas affected by COVID-19. Click here to view more.
 
INTERIM GUIDANCE FOR BUSINESSES FROM THE CDC
 
For the general American public, such as workers in non-healthcare settings and where it is unlikely that work tasks create an increased risk of exposures to COVID-19, the immediate health risk from COVID-19 is considered low.
 
The CDC and its partners will continue to monitor national and international data on the severity of illness caused by COVID-19, will disseminate the results of these ongoing surveillance assessments, and will make additional recommendations as needed. To view more information click here.  
Watch for more updates as they become available.